Visa notifies customers pertaining to hacked gas pump stations

Visa notifies customers pertaining to hacked gas pump stations

According to Visa’s new warning, if you swipe a credit card at a gas pump station, it could be the main target of cybercriminals. The company said that it had identified three unique attacks that are probably carried out by complex cybercriminal groups. Two fuel dispenser businessmen of North America are attractive targets for hackers. The company said that the compromises of businessmen signify a concerning trend. The sophisticated threat organizations have identified them as attractive targets for tracking data. For instance, a man of Florida was taunted after his Ring security system was hacked. Even the police officer who arrived was also taunted. The hacker also said that according to video footage, the owner had performed sexual acts. In addition, the computer systems of the city of New Orleans were hit with a cyberattack.

The attacks that are carried out on point-of-sale systems seem to be different from the looting of fuel pumps because it required criminals to access the supplier’s internal network. In an incident, hackers were able to access the system via a phishing email that contained a malicious link sent to an employee. Through this link, cybercriminals visited the merchant network and collected payment card data. In the second attack, experts were unable to determine how the hacker gained initial access, but the magnetic strip data from the payment card appeared to have been specifically targeted.

The third attack happened at a hospitality merchant. It is still not clear how many accounts are at risk. In November, Visa has warned that there were more attacks on fuel stations. Businessmen who have not yet adopted chip technology on their terminals are more likely to be targeted by such attacks. The organizations that carried out the attack, including FIN8, are believed to have connections to a vast underground network, in order to easily monetize from the stolen data. Skimming on fuel pumps, which requires a small device to replicate credit card information, remains a continuing threat to the fuel stations.