NASA Finally Discovered Crash Site and Debris of India’s Vikram Moon Lander

NASA Finally Discovered Crash Site and Debris of India’s Vikram Moon Lander

Before few months, India had launched Vikram, a moon lander, along with spacecraft Chandrayaan-2. Unfortunately, the country failed to achieve the feat to land its probe on the lunar surface softly. As a result, India had lost its contact with Vikram lander when the success had remained just a mile above the lunar surface. Despite the massive loss, India’s getting close to the surface marks a crucial achievement. But at the time, there remained no data that could reveal the situation. Now NASA has come forward to help India with the harsh landing. The American space agency has verified images taken by its LRO (Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter). The latest imagery from the lunar satellite reveals the impact site of Indian lunar lander, Vikram.

The LRO team had released the first array of images that reveal the sit on September 26. Besides, many people have downloaded the imagery to seek signs of Vikram. Shanmuga Subramanian, an Indian mechanical engineer and programmer, had noticed some variations in before/after sets of images. After that, he contacted the LRO camera team releasing a positive recognition of debris. On the other hand, after receiving the tip, the LROC team verified the identification by matching the pre and post images.

Shanmuga has spotted a single bright pixel from the first set of images. Besides, the sequencing mosaics have revealed the three massive pieces of about 2×2 pixels. The debris is so tiny that it is hardly noticeable in LRO’s resolution. As per NASA, the newly-spotted trash is at a distance of around 750 meters from the actual crash site. Whereas, ISRO has recently announced that the lunar lander had crashed within 500m of its aimed landing site. Although, the crash took place due to a difficulty in the functioning of its braking thrusters. Apart from this, the Chandrayaan-2, which launched Vikram lander, is still working and revolving around the moon to collect data.